happiesthaunts:

welcome-foolishmortals:

Some awesome Halloween themed scented candles from ~WitchCityWicks~

Yes hello I’ll take all of them

(Source: gothicbelledesigns)

(Reblogged from happiesthaunts)

pure, protective magical concentration of happiness and hope 

(Source: trusthim)

(Reblogged from castielstiel)
I want to write a novel about silence. The things people don’t say.
Virginia Woolf (via skyiseverywhere)

(Source: wordsthat-speak)

(Reblogged from eldritch-mermaid)
(Reblogged from eldritch-mermaid)
Consider me still in love
Consider me still — with you.
(Reblogged from violentwavesofemotion)
Annie (a pseudonym) is a Chinese-American, straight, female university professor. While she was in graduate school, she found it difficult to receive medical treatment due to the perceived psychiatric condition of simply being Asian and female: “I went to a doctor at the university because I had recurring abdominal pain. The doctor listened to my description, but rather than doing a physical exam, he explained to me that it was normal for Asian women to be anxious and stressed out, and anxiety was probably causing my abdominal pain.” But surprisingly, the doctor didn’t treat the anxiety either. He just said there was nothing he could do.
(Reblogged from roughguess)
Books were (and still are) my way of understanding the world. When I felt like being a girl and being a nerd didn’t make sense in the same body, Hermione Granger was there to teach me better. When awkward middle school crushes threatened to overtake all my cognitive functions, Eragon flew me off on fantastical journeys that stretched my brain further than a braces-filled conversation with any boy ever could.

But devoted as I was to the universes hiding between the covers of my favorite books, I couldn’t help but start to wonder why I never read about people who looked like me. I didn’t see us at journalism competitions, on TV discussing New York Times bestsellers, or assigned on any syllabi. Did Black writers not exist? Or worse yet, were Black people just not worth reading and writing about? To have the one thing that makes sense to you in this world reject your existence almost entirely is no simple diss. It tells you your stories don’t matter, your voice is better off unused, your problems aren’t real. Or worse yet, that you are the problem.

For a long time, this forced me to reconsider my love affair with literature; unrequited love isn’t really my thing. I spent a long time avoiding books because I didn’t want to be antagonized even in a fantasy realm, to always be the nondescript footnote in someone else’s memoir. It was only after immersing myself in the words of Toni Morrison, Frederick Douglass, Junot Díaz, CLR James, Maya Angelou and other Black authors that I fell back into the warmth of literary intimacy.
(Reblogged from spookyyy-mulder)

Mulder and Scully + season one lack of personal space.

(Source: danascullys)

(Reblogged from mulders)
If you’re a student in one of the black schools here and you get into a fight you’ll probably get arrested and charged with assault. We have kids here who are barred from voting before they’re even old enough to register.

A black (male) protestor/resident of Ferguson, as quoted in Newsweek. 

Here is where the “talking-head”/op-ed bent of our media and culture has failed us. While they all want to bemoan the “12% voter turnout at the last election,” no one has the sense to ask about the structural forces that contribute to that low figure. Instead they (and I’m including Al Sharpton in this category) yell at black voters to do their part, or, when they’re being nice about it, try to get protestors to register to vote. But listen to those protestors who cannot vote. They’re telling us they never stood a chance.

(via madrassoup)

See also: It’s a privilege to throw out “Just go vote! Get your voice heard!” because everybody doesn’t get that.

(via ethiopienne)

(Reblogged from spookyyy-mulder)
leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

(Reblogged from eledhwens)

(Source: anarcho-maymays)

(Reblogged from retro-revolutionary)

alexanderhamiltonisthebottom:

share a coke with a  c o m r a d e 

(Reblogged from retro-revolutionary)

(Source: downeysjrmoved)

(Reblogged from castielstiel)

(Source: marrowack)

(Reblogged from tenementhalls)

harrysde:

From Elon James White Tuesday night.

(Reblogged from stalinistqueens)